Browsing articles in "Muscle Cars"
Aug 25, 2015
Comments Off on Haunted Highways: A Pony of a Different Color

Haunted Highways: A Pony of a Different Color

CobraRheadIn recent years, the great pony car war of Mustang versus Camaro has been better than ever. The Coyote 5.0 in the GT is a bona fide Camaro-killer, and the Corvette-based LT1 is a old school torque-monster ready for any challenge. Continue reading »

Jul 13, 2015
Comments Off on Haunted Highways: 2002 Chevy Camaro SS

Haunted Highways: 2002 Chevy Camaro SS

ss1Before the automotive world took a giant downturn in 2002 by watching one of its longest tenured power-players cease production, GM decided to give us a Camaro worth remembering.  The Fourth Generation Camaro was not wholly innovative in its execution, nor was it a fully formed, new iteration of the venerable Pony Car; what it was, however, was a very stout, rip-roaring good time on any back road, on-ramp, or traffic light in the country.  Continue reading »

Nov 12, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on Javelin Put AMC on the Muscle Car Map

Javelin Put AMC on the Muscle Car Map

amchead

The American Motors Corporation was a company that was around from 1954 through 1988. However, the history of the company dates back further, because it was formed out of a merger between Hudson and Nash.

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May 23, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on 1970 Was a Very Good Year for the Ford Torino

1970 Was a Very Good Year for the Ford Torino

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Americans know the city of Detroit as the “Motor City,” and rightfully so. Detroit has always been the hub of auto making in the United States. However, other countries have their own versions of the Motor City. In Italy, the city of Turin is the equivalent of Detroit with regard to automobile manufacturing.

Ford decided to blend the two when they came up with the Ford Torino. In Italian, this is how you spell Turin.

The Torino was initially introduced as a version of the Ford Fairlane. It was rolled out for the 1968 model year, and by 1970, the roles were reversed. At that time the Torino became the intermediate standard-bearer for Ford, and the Fairlane became a lower-end Torino.

The body style for the 1970 Torino was eye-catching, to say the least. It was long and sleek in the front, with a low sitting top and a quickly tapering rear. There was the standard Torino which came in four different body styles, including a station wagon.

The Torino Brougham was the upscale offering. It also came as a station wagon, along with a two-door and a four-door sedan.

Those who were looking for a more sporty edge could turn to the Torino GT. You could get the two-door SportsRoof GT, or a Torino GT ragtop.

The performance minded could opt for the Ford Torino Cobra. When you have the chance to buy a car called a Cobra, if you ask me, you have to pounce. The standard engine in the 1970 Torino Cobra was the 360-horsepower, 429-cubic-inch Thunder Jet.

One step up was the 429 CJ or Cobra Jet that was rated at 370 horses. At the top of the heap was the 429 Super Cobra Jet, which was available with or without Ram Air induction.

Executives at Ford had to be pleased with the way that the 1970 Torino was received by the buying public and the automotive intelligentsia alike. During that model year Ford was able to churn out over 230,000 Torino units. If that wasn’t enough, the 1970 Ford Torino was named Motor Trend Car of the Year.

That was not the final chapter for the Torino. The Gran Torino was introduced for the 1972 model year, and we will look at that car when we tell the rest of the Torino story in an upcoming post.

Apr 14, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on The Unforgettable Oldsmobile 442

The Unforgettable Oldsmobile 442

olds4421970

The Oldsmobile division of General Motors became defunct back in 2004. It’s almost hard to believe that such a venerable automotive brand is slowly but surely dissolving into the annals of history, but time marches on. Continue reading »

Apr 7, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on American Muscle: The Pontiac GTO

American Muscle: The Pontiac GTO

1966 Pontiac GTO

1966 Pontiac GTO

Though it is debatable, depending on your precise definition of a muscle car, many people would say that the classic American muscle cars started with the release of the Pontiac GTO for the 1964 model year. Continue reading »

Mar 28, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on Sweet Shelby GT 500 Up For Grabs

Sweet Shelby GT 500 Up For Grabs

Larry Brown's '69 Mustang Shelby GT 500

Caroll Shelby has gone down in history as one of the most iconic automotive figures of all time. He was the mastermind behind a couple of the most legendary classics ever produced: the AC Cobra and the Shelby Mustangs. Continue reading »

Mar 21, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on Beep Beep! The Plymouth Road Runner

Beep Beep! The Plymouth Road Runner

4359_1968_Road_Runner

Sometimes an original vision gets twisted as time goes on. Purists will tell you that the original muscle cars were supposed be affordable to everyday people. The idea was to scrimp on the accessories in the interior so that most of the money spent on the car would be go under the hood. It was all about satisfying the need for speed without breaking the bank. Continue reading »

Mar 17, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on Dodge Challenger: You Just Know

Dodge Challenger: You Just Know

4351_1959_Dodge_Silver_Challenger_a_-Barn_Find- (2)

When I was a kid I asked my mother how you recognize the girl that you should marry. She said quite simply, “You just know.”

Granted, the stakes may not be as high, but a similar dynamic exists when it comes to buying a new car. You might as well hang on to your old car until you find something that really blows you away.  Continue reading »

Jan 21, 2014
Clay Ritchings
Comments Off on 1978 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am

1978 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am



Little-Known Fact:
 The Pontiac’s T-top roof, which first became an option in 1976, was as close as a buyer could get to a convertible Trans Am. These lift-out roof sections were initially made by Hurst and were known as the Hurst Hatch. The problem was, they leaked. This led Pontiac to develop its own T-tops within GM’s Fisher body division and launch the option midway through the 1978 model year. So some ’78 Firebirds have Hurst T-tops and others have the Fisher units. You can spot the difference because the Fisher glass roof panels are larger than the Hurst Hatch ones.

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