Dec 26, 2014
Gary P. Garry
Comments Off on Will Cuba Thaw Open Classic Car Honey Hole?

Will Cuba Thaw Open Classic Car Honey Hole?

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When you are looking for something good that is rare, you are not alone. People having been doing that for a long time, so it gets harder and harder as the few gems that still exist get bought up.

This is the way it is with classic cars, and it is challenging to find the diamond in the rough. There are some barn finds here and there, and there are some aging collectors who finally decide that they will never get around to the projects they have had on the back burner for 30 years.

If and when they are ready to sell, some options enter the marketplace. And if they never get around to that either, there are estate sales that provide some classic car inventory.

The point is that the pickins’ are slim, but that’s why these cars are valuable if you are fortunate enough to find one.

A big barn full of classic cars that no one has ever been able to buy before could be described as a treasure trove (or as my boys on American Pickers would say, a honey hole). If that would be a mega-pick, what would you call a country full of classic cars that has been closed off from doing business with the United States for 54 years?

Regardless of your political philosophies, if you are a classic car collector, the recent thawing of our country’s relationship with Cuba could open up some interesting avenues. In the 1950s there were Cubans who had some money to spend, and they bought American cars that we consider to be classics today.

There is a big classic car culture there, and many of the American cars that were purchased before the embargo have been well maintained over the years. You would have to think that it would be a fertile market for collectors from the U.S. if trade restrictions are lifted.

Of course, there is one fly in the ointment. They haven’t been able to buy stuff from us, so original parts have been out of reach. A lot of the American classics that are cruising the roadways in Cuba are pieced together under the surface with a mishmash of parts from various different cars that weren’t built in the United States.

Still, there will be cars of value entering the marketplace if the relations resume, according to reports. This is an intriguing development, and it is something to keep your eye on if your classic car searches often seem like they are more akin to snipe hunts.

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